Gulf States Office Tours Sustainable Farms in Alabama

 

Members of the NCAT Gulf States Office toured sustainable farms in Alabama recently, in order to show how sustainable farm practices can be implemented on a small scale.

Hosting the tour was Edwin Marty, director of E.A.T. South of Montgomery, Ala.

Marty showed Mississippi FoodCorps members and staff from the Mississippi Roadmap to Health Equity office in Jackson, MS, two farms at Montgomery: the E.A.T. South Downtown Farm and the Hampstead Farm.

E.A.T. South Executive Director Edwin Marty (right) explains sustainable agriculture practices employed at its downtown Montgomery, Ala., urban farm Oct. 16, 2013. (Photo by Jim Ewing, NCAT)
E.A.T. South Executive Director Edwin Marty (right) explains sustainable agriculture practices employed at its downtown Montgomery, Ala., urban farm Oct. 16, 2013. (Photo by Jim Ewing, NCAT)

The Downtown farm demonstrates how even an inner city urban area can successfully be used to grow healthy, nutritious and local food. A Brownfield site, the farm serves two purposes: as a demonstration for safely growing food on a site known to be contaminated with chemical byproducts from an old railroad site, and as demonstration of how to reclaim such land using natural methods (bioremediation).

The Hampstead Farm site is an example of “new urbanism.” It’s a component of a planned community that provides locally grown fresh food for residents.

Here are some photos:

E.A.T. South Executive Director Edwin Marty explains how a "butterfly roof" rain cachement system works, Oct. 16, 2013. (Photo by Jim Ewing, NCAT)
E.A.T. South Executive Director Edwin Marty explains how a “butterfly roof” rain cachement system works, Oct. 16, 2013. (Photo by Jim Ewing, NCAT)
A produce washing stand is pictured at the Hampstead "New Urbanism" farm at Montgomery, Ala. The farm site supplies community supported agriculture (CSA) food to the residents as the agriculture component of the planned community. (Photo by Jim Ewing, NCAT)
A produce washing stand is pictured at the Hampstead “New Urbanism” farm at Montgomery, Ala. The farm site supplies community supported agriculture (CSA) food to the residents as the agriculture component of the planned community. (Photo by Jim Ewing, NCAT)
Members of the NCAT Gulf States Regional Office, Mississippi Roadmap to Health Equity and FoodCorps service members pose with EAT South Executive Director Edwin Marty (right) in Montgomery, Ala., Oct. 16, 2013. From left: front: FoodCorps Members Mariel Parman, Claire Brown and Rebecca Rosenthal; Roadmap Executive Director Beneta Burt and NCAT Ag Specialist Felicia Bell; back row: FoodCorps Director Willie Nash, FoodCorps Fellow Liz Broussard, NCAT Gulf States Regional Director Rockiell Woods and Marty. (Photo by Jim Ewing)
Members of the NCAT Gulf States Regional Office, Mississippi Roadmap to Health Equity and FoodCorps service members pose with EAT South Executive Director Edwin Marty (right) in Montgomery, Ala., Oct. 16, 2013. From left: front: FoodCorps Members Mariel Parman, Claire Brown and Rebecca Rosenthal; Roadmap Executive Director Beneta Burt and NCAT Ag Specialist Felicia Bell; back row: FoodCorps Director Willie Nash, FoodCorps Fellow Liz Broussard, NCAT Gulf States Regional Director Rockiell Woods and Marty. (Photo by Jim Ewing)

For more on E.A.T. South, see: http://www.eatsouth.org/

Marty has recently completed a book about urban farming in America called Breaking Through Concrete, published by the University of California Press in 2012 www.breakingthroughconcrete.com.

The NCAT Office is happy to help show sustainable farming techniques to civic groups and service organizations in the Gulf States Region, as well as provide expertise and technical information for new and beginning farmers and established farmers wishing to transition to sustainable practices. Contact the Gulf States Office toll free:  866-643-2767.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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